Selling Your Home? Home Improvement Projects to Avoid

Many homeowners each year make the mistake of thinking that any home improvement project is a good one in terms of adding value to their home. Unfortunately, this is simply not true. There are some home improvement projects you can take on which will not improve the value of your home in terms of the money you spend on the project and there are even other home improvement projects which can detract from the value of your home. If you think you may sell your home at some point in the future, it is imperative to make sure you know which home improvement projects to tackle and which ones to avoid.

The first thing to keep in mind when considering any home improvement project is that you do not want to outdo the neighbors. While the old adage of keeping up with the Joneses is certainly true to a degree, you do not want to exceed them. A home that is largely out of the price range of its neighbors is usually going to be more difficult to sell than a home that is in keeping with the rest of the neighborhood.

Two of the biggest mistakes you can make on home improvement projects is spending money on highly individualized projects and technological advancements. Avoid spending money on items such as saunas and steam baths. Such improvements might add to the value of your property but if the buyers viewing your home are not interested in these items you may find it more difficult to sell the property.

The same is also true for swimming pools. Many homeowners make the grave mistake of believing that a pool with add to the value and desirability of their home. This is definitely not true. Many buyers, especially those with small children, avoid homes with pools. Even if a buyer does not have small children they may be concerned about the maintenance issues that go along with having a swimming pool. The simple fact is that homes with pools generally tend to take longer to sell than homes that do not have a pool. If you are considering adding a pool to your home make sure you are doing it for the right reasons, because you will enjoy it, and not because you want to improve the value of your home. Otherwise, the addition of a pool should be avoided.

In addition, it is imperative to avoid spending a lot of money on technological advancements which will usually quickly become outdated. This is a waste of money that will usually not net you a large return.

Ideally, it is usually the simplest things which will bring you the highest rate of return in terms of home improvement projects. Simple projects such as ensuring your home has a fresh coat of paint or improving your landscaping can add a lot of value to your home and make it more desirable. Never underestimate the power of curb appeal; particularly in homes that are considered to be luxury properties.

This has become increasingly popular today when more buyers are beginning their property search on the Internet. Statistics indicate that some 80% of buyers actually begin looking for properties online. A photograph is truly worth more than a thousand words in these circumstances. If your home lacks curb appeal this could mean that it will the house that languishes on the market for months while other homes with more curb appeal sell much faster.

There are certainly some areas in which it makes more financial sense to focus your money if you are considering selling your home. Staging is one of them. Studies indicate that homes which have been professionally staged are selling faster and for more money than homes that have not been professionally staged. Luxury homes may even be able to sell for up to 20% more with staging than homes that are not staged.

You should also keep in mind the features that are most popular in homes right now. Kitchens and master bedrooms continue to rank high in importance with most buyers. Buyers are looking for master bedrooms which can serve as sanctuaries and have features such as vaulted ceilings and fireplaces.

The main key is to make sure that regardless of what types of home improvement projects you take on, you do not go too far. There is definitely something to the old cliché ‘too much of a good thing’ and that is certainly true in the case of home improvement projects.

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Home Improvement – How to Recession-Proof Your Home Improvement Plans

As the 2008 recession lingers into its fourth year, many consumers have closed their wallets to a long list of “big ticket” purchases, and home improvements appear to be riding the top of that list.

According to a 2010 Bigresearch.com study, home owners are throwing their home improvements plans out the window like burnt toast. Over 20% of those surveyed said they were putting-off all forms of home improvement indefinitely. Interestingly, this percentage ranked second highest among all survey questions, with only “vacation travel” showing a higher figure (25%).

With cash reserves at a premium, many home owners have simply decided to wait on making improvements, and understandably so. Faced with record unemployment, higher costs of living, rising taxes and a dim view of any short term changes for the better, who could blame them?

Worse yet, home improvements have historically yielded very low returns when compared to their actual cost. In fact, Remodeling Magazine’s 2009-10 “cost vs. value” report reveals that home owners, on average, recoup less than of 65% of the money they invest in their home improvement projects.

But before you conclude that your home improvement plans should be scraped, let’s take a step back.

There are very few home owners who wouldn’t admit to needing some measure of improvement to their home. Whether it’s as simple as repairing the leaky faucet gasket that drives you crazy with its relentless dripping, or an unreliable front porch light fixture that leaves you fumbling around in the dark when you return home from a long day at work. Every house has its deficiencies.

But with a recession in full bloom, and statistics showing little to no hope of ever getting your money back, why would anyone bother with a home improvement project?

Though at first it may seem like a lost cause or verging on lunacy, there are simple solutions that many consumers are using to solve this problem.

First, let’s address the big one. The statistics from Remodeling Magazine and other similar resources, assume that a building contractor is being paid to perform all the labor and to supply all the materials. And if you assume, on average, approximately 50% of the total costs of most home improvement projects will be attributable to labor and fees, you can literally transform the investment returns by performing the majority of the work yourself. What was once a 35% loss becomes a 30% gain by simply providing your own labor force. Not a bad return in any economy.

Second, although the IRS does not allow deductions for most voluntary home improvements, they do allow you to add the costs of your improvements to the cost basis of your home. And for tax purposes, this will help minimize any tax burden you might face when you sell your home. I don’t claim to be a tax expert, but you can easily verify your cost basis and tax deduction options by talking with you’re tax accountant.

So how do you perform the work yourself? If you think tackling your home improvement project is beyond your ability, you’re in for a surprise. It’s not!

Like many things, the more you do something the more proficient you become, but construction is not terribly complex. It doesn’t require years of schooling and technical expertise to comprehend. It’s not brain surgery. It’s arguably more art than science. In fact, if you can draw a straight line, read a measuring tape and you don’t mind getting a little dirty you’re a perfect candidate for tacking your own home improvements.

Minimizing the more difficult projects like relocating load bearing walls, or changing roof lines, can make the project much easier and less costly. And you may need a licensed electrician, plumber or other skilled craftsman along the way, but if you use them sparingly and only when absolutely required, you’ll save a tremendous amount of money.

There are plenty of free resources you can use to estimate material costs, determine the right tools to use, and establish the right strategy for actually getting the work done efficiently.

So start with online resources. There are thousands of them. You’ll find estimating tools, materials suppliers and hundreds of “how to” manuals. Even the “Dummies Store” can be a great resource. And don’t hesitate to talk with the professionals at your favorite material supply store when you need advice. Asking for assistance and opinions from someone you trust (a neighbor or relative) can also be extremely helpful. Most of the expertise you need is at your fingertips, and it won’t cost you a penny.

Don’t forget to check with your lender, your city officials (construction permitting) and any governing HOA for the requirements they may have related to your planned improvements.

And if you don’t have the tools you need to complete a specific part of the project, remember tools can be rented. And you can find them in most pawn shops for pennies on the dollar. Don’t assume you have to buy “new” tools.

The benefits of this straightforward strategy are multi-faceted. Not only can you enjoy the convenience of your improvements, but you can enjoy a tremendous return on investment at the time of re-financing or sale.

And in light of the economy, it’s not a bad way to get the family, friends and neighbors involved in something productive, something everyone can contribute to and something everyone can enjoy for years to come.

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Home Improvement Marketing – What Works, What Doesn’t, What Might and Why

Home improvement companies large and small know that getting their message heard by homeowners in need isn’t easy. Home improvement contractors are everywhere, and each is vying for attention. Open any given value pack mailer or local coupon publication and you will see page after page of home improvement ads. From lawn services, landscapers, deck, pool & patio contractors to roofing, siding and windows, carpet, bathroom, sun room and basement remodelers, the list goes on and on.

So as a contractor, how do you get your message heard? What marketing works, what doesn’t, and what aren’t we sure about? The answers depend somewhat on your local market and your budget, but here I provide some sure things that can be done no matter what your market or budget, and some tips on making the most of all of your efforts.

What Works

When I say ‘What Works’, I am talking about items that I have personally used to market my clients that I wouldn’t hesitate to employ for any home improvement company. These are methods that have proven time and time again to be worth the investment. There are very few ‘sure things’ in home improvement marketing, but I’ll bet on these methods every time.

Website – Now more than ever, the standout method of marketing that continues to show solid return on investment (ROI) is your website. Day after day, night after night, your website – if done right – can generate lead after lead. I’ve seen home improvement companies that do ZERO cold-calling and canvassing, and still generate millions of dollars in revenue due in part to their investment in a well-done, highly-optimized website. The key, however, is the ‘well-done’ part. Frankly, any jackleg contractor can get a website – maybe even an attractive one. But without the proper construction and search engine optimization techniques, it will serve as little more than an online brochure. Do yourself a favor and find a search engine pro that can analyze your site and help make changes that will get it working to generate quality leads.

Pay-per-click (Google) Advertising – Your website, as well-optimized as it may be – can’t possibly achieve top ranking for all of the key words and phrases that you need to reach your audience. Today’s searchers in many cases are using broad terms like ‘lawn service’ to find what they need. And at last check, on Google the term ‘lawn service’ yielded 9,400,000 results. If you’re part of one of the large franchises, you have a chance of being found. But if you’re Joe’s local lawn service, fagettaboutit. Your only hope in that broad search is to have your site pop up in the Sponsored Listings, or pay-per-clicks. Setting up Google pay-per-click advertising takes a little know-how, but is certainly available to anyone.

Signage – Contractors are on the road and in neighborhoods far more than they are in any office. They are out and about, all over their covered area day after day. Outfit those trucks – whether they are pick-up trucks, step vans or large vehicles – with nicely done signs, and you have yourself a rolling billboard. Forget the subtle vinyl lettering or magnetic sign – spend a little more on a colorful wrap (no need to wrap the whole thing – doors, the back window, and/or tailgate will do) and you will surely get noticed. In addition to vehicle signs, be sure to put a yard sign at every single installment. A yard sign is as good as a personal referral. And in today’s busy society when time spent talking to your neighbors can be few a far between, it allows the opportunity to broadcast to an entire neighborhood that one of their own has put their trust in you for their latest project. I’ve even seen home improvement companies provide incentives to homeowners for keeping the signs in their yard for extended periods of time. Well worth it.

Ratings-based Organizations – Organizations like the Better Business Bureau and Angie’s List allow their members and/or the general public to rate their experiences with contractors. And while many contractors shy away from these organizations for fear of bad ratings, my experience has been positive with these services. That is, of course, if you are reputable contractor. If you’re a successful contractor who has built a business based on referrals and quality workmanship, these services will speak for themselves. And when you do get you’re A+ rating, use it. Post it on your website and in ads, and it too can serve as a virtual referral.

Social Media Marketing – While the jury is still out on exactly how to track the direct return on your social media marketing investment, I wouldn’t hesitate to set aside a small amount of time and marketing budget for social media marketing. Why? Well for one, it’s about as low-cost as you can get. It has the potential to be viral, and strong testimonial/referral benefits are there as well. It also tells the world that you are on top of things – you’re progressive and stand out as a leader in your field. I don’t recommend spending 2 hours a day tweeting, but spending 10 minutes a day to post an item or two to your Facebook business page and Twitter account can have great benefits.

PR – Getting into a regular routine of doing press releases about anything you can think of that might catch the attention of the local press is worthwhile. After a while, regular releases containing good information will catch the attention of the local media. You may even become their go-to people for home improvement information. Invest a little time in putting together a press-kit with your leaders’ biographies, a one-sheet about your company, and any articles, guides, or content you have is worth doing once a year. Then, be on the lookout for news worthy things to write about – significant new hires, a government regulation that affects your industry or homeowners, new products and services can all be spun into information that reporters will look out for.

Sales Support – One often overlooked area of home improvement marketing is sales support, however when done right, it can have an amazing return. Companies hire a guy, hand him some business card, send him on his way and expect great returns. Your sales team is the face of your business to customers, and you no doubt spend time agonizing over who to hire. So when you have a good team in place, do the right thing and arm them with the proper tools to make the sale quicker. Online presentations, e-mailable resource links, business cards, and leave-behinds should all be high on the list of items that your team has in their sales toolbox.

What Doesn’t Work

‘What Doesn’t Work’ is based on experience, and consists of items that you’d have to hold me down and force me to spend money on. That’s not to say that in some cases, some markets they don’t work, but at best, I consider these items to be hit or miss.

Large Phone Book Advertising – When I say ‘large phone book’ I am talking about the big yellow pages books. It’s no secret that these directories – in print – are dying. With internet availability everywhere and a strong push toward environmental responsibility, directory companies are scrambling to stay alive by offering online options. Unless you’re tracking your phone book response diligently and seeing a return, my advice would be to get out. Or at least reduce to in-column listings.

Pay-per-lead Services – For the contractor who has no other method of getting leads, this might be a source to get started, but in my experience, pay-per-lead services don’t work. Typically they are pricey, and they sell the leads they get to multiple contractors. Even the ones that promise exclusivity have turned out to be duds. Whether they are the major players or the smaller ones, all have had the same results. Very low quality leads and at a cost far too high.

Value Pack Mailers – Coupon-based value pack mailers are the definition of hit or miss. If you catch a home who opens the pack, and if he or she has an immediate need for what you’re selling and if he or she is attracted by the ad or offer, you might get some action. That’s a lot of if’s. In my experience, these packs are not cheap, and they are loaded with home improvement companies. In fact, during the writing of this article I received one in the mail. Out of the 45 ads in the pack, 22 of them – nearly 50% – were from home improvement companies. Can I possibly stand out in a crowd like this, and hit the homeowner at the exact right moment? Hmmmm…not really liking those odds.

Pricey Print Advertising – While some may argue that a flashy ad in a magazine has branding appeal, I have seen very little direct return on this type of investment. To get into the magazines, your money would be better spent doing PR that will get you a text mention or even an article.

What Might Work

The items that fall under the category of ‘What Might Work’ are items that are hit or miss, but have the added intangible value of branding. So while we can’t necessarily measure all of the effectiveness of these efforts, we have a sense that they do have some value. The recommendation on these would be to keep the dollars spent in check, but give the activities that fit your budget a shot.

Broadcast Advertising – Broadcast advertising is great for getting your name out there, but can be really expensive. A savvy marketer can find some diamonds in the rough – broadcast efforts that have a decent reach and a decent price tag – but they are hard to find. If broadcast is a part of your mix, try your best to track your efforts. Put landing page URL’s on your ads, whether they are radio or television ads, and a tracking phone number. Create an offer that is unique to the spot for additional tracking. And by all means, with this and every other marketing effort, talk to your customers about how they heard about you initially. If you hear ‘I heard/saw your commercial’ over and over, you will have a sense that it is working.

Event Marketing – Events range in size and price from affordable local events like street festivals and school-sponsored events to large home and garden shows, wine festivals, etc. The large shows can be tough to see a big return on – they are expensive to secure space, and expensive to haul your stuff and staff – and you can get lost in the noise of dozens of other companies just like yours. Smaller, more localized events, though, can have a nice return. While you won’t be getting a huge quantity of leads, you will likely have more time to spend with the people you do meet, and you won’t be competing with too many other companies like yours.

Direct Mail – The options for direct mail vary from mass mailers that can cost a fortune for printing and postage, to smaller, more cost-effective efforts. In my experience, stay away from mass mailings. The return is very low. However, neighborhood mailers from companies like Quantum Digital can have a decent return. When you are able to choose a select set of streets to mail to, you can keep your cost down by doing small runs, and you can piggyback on other efforts. For example, if Joe’s Roofing is doing a nice roof on Maple Street, Joe’s team knows when the install is happening. If they have their marketing efforts in sync, they can log into the mailer system, and choose Maple Street and its surrounding streets to mail to. Then, while his crew is there with their trucks (that have great signage) and there’s a nice job sign in the yard, the neighbors will receive a “We’re working in your neighborhood!” mailer. Bam! You have 3 solid hits to an entire neighborhood with very little cost.

Low-cost Print Advertising – It is tough to cut through the clutter with print advertising, but I have seen some success in choosing specialized, low-cost publications. School papers, and local papers with classified ads or event listings, can provide the benefit of showing community support, can showcase your branding, and may even get you a few leads.

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Home Improvement and Home Remodeling – Spicing Up Your Home

Everyone wants their house to be beautiful. We all would love to do a whole new makeover on our house and make it brand new. In fact, most people would love to build a brand new, from scratch, gorgeous house; designing everything exactly the way we would want it to be. This is not always a realistic option, but it is a nice dream.

It may seem like all the neighbors on your block are moving out; headed to bigger and better places, while you stay in the exact same house you have been in for decades. Or, they may stay put, but they knock down their already giant houses and start building from scratch. This may make your one hundred and fifty year old house look decrepit and like a small fish next to these new and improved giant sharks. At the very least, your neighbors are probably doing some home remodeling that leaves their interior looking like a small museum. How do you live like this? How can you watch all these football fields being built and still feel good about yourself? It’s not easy. Luckily, there are home improvements and home remodeling that you too can do without taking out a second mortgage.

If you go through each room in your house and make a list of what you want fixed up, eventually it will. Pick certain things that are priority and then get started. There are many things you can do yourself that does not warrant hiring people; fixing broken objects and throwing out the non-fixable ones is a way to start. This makes a difference you can not realize until it is done. It is the perfect way to start; as it paves the way for everything else, and enables you to see what you need new.

This is how you start; by doing the small home improvements even a little remodeling. Then, if your wallet allows it, you can move on to the bigger home remodeling.

Start with the things that can not last any longer. If your blinds and windows in your living room are cracked and broken; that is a great place to start. If there is plumbing issues in the bathroom; that is also a great starter. Then, move on to see how your walls in the house look. You would be surprised what a paint job and new blinds can do for the look in your house. Another big one is carpeting; either new or ripping it up and laying down new floors. That is a tremendous difference in the interior of your house. These few things are the starting points for all your rooms. They can make a world of a difference in the way your house looks; while at the same time it is much more affordable than completely renovating.

Once you have finished the smaller jobs, you can see that there really are not as many big jobs as you thought; because they all go hand in hand. Of course, once you want to move onto bigger things, you can start knocking down walls and completely remodeling each room.

Before you cringe at the bill; don’t. There are things you can do for home improvement that are quite affordable. There are also home remodeling options for cheaper than you think. You don’t have to be the only one on the block with old blinds; to peek at the neighbors new remodeling.

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Getting Your Mind’s Worth on Home Improvements and Keeping the Change

So you’ve realized that you need a bigger boat since your family has begun using hand signals to avoid collisions. You’re flipping a home before it flips you. Or perhaps your roof needs to be replaced because you can’t seem to find any more pots to collect rain water. Homeowners and property investors alike, all reach moments when home improvements are simply inevitable. And unfortunately, it isn’t always fun.

During this exciting time, anticipation is high, and initially, your tendency may be to focus on all of the positive benefits of completing your new project. After all, the excitement is what probably drove you to make the decision in the first place. Or maybe not. Perhaps it was your spouse who’s been begging for years, or your tenants at the courthouse. If that’s the case then you’re a bit more advanced and lucky for you, these emotions will no longer be mentioned in the next paragraph.

Once you begin considering the costs, the plans, the time, the mess and the stress of completing your new project, your cheek muscles will begin to tire from holding that smile. Your face will soon begin to change, resembling that of a puppy dog, which will become a permanent mask that you will wear until the day your project is completed. You may find yourself reminiscing about a previous disastrous project, or if this is your first, perhaps you begin to hear the echoes from horrific contractor stories-compliments of your friends and neighbors.

The fact is, you can avoid most problems, stress and financial setbacks when undergoing home improvements.

Hiring a contractor for any project should not be a decision that you can simply “leave to the pros”. Unless you’re extremely passive, collect your money from trees in your backyard, or both, chances are you will want to have at least moderate control over the project. And most importantly, control over the funds that you’ll be pouring into it. In order to avoid most problems associated with home improvements, you must get involved early, before it’s over your head.

Below is a general guide that should aid you in holding on to that smile without jeopardizing Johnny’s college fund.

From Gray to White.

It’s time to move all of those wonderful ideas from the gray matter into some fresh white paper. Get yourself a grid notebook and a pencil, and draw out a sketch or diagram. Don’t worry, you don’t need to learn CADD and check it for proper scale, just draw it out to the best of your ability. At this point this will be used simply as a visual aid. Doing this will also ensure that you to consider certain obstacles that may need to be addressed before moving forward.

Unite and Conquer.

Before standing on a chair and dictating your project plans to the ones who will be directly impacted by them, consider sharing your ideas first. Whether this will be to your family members, or if an investment property, to your tenants or real estate agent.

First, begin explaining the reasons for your project, and then the benefits. You’ll want to be able to share the same excitement you felt when you first thought about the project. This will get their attention and more feedback since they are now part of the plan. Bring all of your sketches, and let everyone have a look. Don’t forget your pencil, and make sure it has a fresh eraser at the end. You’ll be amazed to learn all of the different questions and ideas that come out of doing this. Although hard to accept, at the end of this meeting you may even end up with a much better idea, very different from your own.

Now will be a good time to discuss finances and set a budget with your spouse or anyone who may be financially affected by the project. Come up with a reasonable figure and an absolute limit to your budget.

One, two, three…

Now that you have compiled enough information for a rough draft on why the project is needed, let’s discuss what is needed.

With some simple research on the internet or at your local home improvement store, you should now create a list of different materials or products that you might consider for your project. This will help you get more educated on what is actually available. Gather this information on your notebook and list everything by preference and cost- to show the impact on your budget.
Next, find out what the requirements are for your project. You may need to pull a building permit through your city or state. Don’t do anything without it. If you are caught with a permit you may be forced to completely tear down your entire project, at whatever stage you’re in. You don’t want that to happen. Again, this information can be easily located and sometimes ordered through the internet.

If you live in a closed community, check with your home owners association, they may also have bylaws which you may be required to comply with.

Sub Total.

Contractors usually purchase materials at wholesale prices, which is usually between 10% to 20% cheaper then the retail price quotes you may get, so you’re much better off having the contractor provide the materials themselves. But even if you don’t plan on purchasing the materials, it is a good idea to add them all up at this point. This figure will provide you with excellent insight on cost and can be used as leverage when the pricing phase begins.
If necessary, touch up your specifications so that you know how much of what is necessary. The more precise the specs, the more accurate your material costs will be.

Putting it Together.

Most home improvement projects are labor intensive. This means that much of the costs associated are a direct result of hiring someone to put it all together. This is of course, on of the most important pieces of it all, since without it, all you’re left with is an overly erased piece of grid paper with chicken scratch. The process of selecting a contractor is crucial, and there are many things you should consider doing before hiring.

Everyone has got Something to Say.

Friends and neighbors can certainly provide positive (or negative) feedback on local contractors. But don’t settle for just that alone. Just because things worked out well for your neighbor, does not mean that they will for you.
Today, with a few simple clicks of the mouse, you can go from being a novice to an expert consumer in a matter of minutes. Go online and visit websites that offer descriptive business profiles and customer reviews. This will give you a much better idea on who to consider and who to stay away from. It’s like having multiple neighbors now, providing you with feedback for free! Consider the length of time the business has been around too, you don’t want your project to be the first of its kind for a contractor. Also consider visiting the Better Business Bureau to review information on any contractor you’re considering. You’ll have access to review any complaints (or compliments) made by prior customers, again providing you with excellent free information.

On Your Mark, Get Set, Go!

Once you’ve selected two or three potential contractors, gather up all of your information and reach out to each one for a free quote. This process is called RFQ, short for Request for Quotation. You will want to provide as much detail as possible in order to get an accurate figure back from bidders. Schedule a time when bidders can meet with you in person to review your details and the actual work site. Don’t forget to include a date when quotes are due, so that you’re not sitting around waiting to get them all back.
After all your hard work and research, there’s no greater feeling then knowing what you’re talking about. Make sure the contractor understands that you’ve done your homework. Use your newly acquired terminology with them and be clear about what you know and what you expect. Your new skills will help you tremendously when your project is quoted and during any negotiations. You should feel confident that you’ll be getting what you pay for.

Make sure that you request the following documents from all bidding contractors:

o A current copy of their License & Insurance

o Proof of Workman’s Compensation

o Customer References (be sure to take the time to contact each one!)

You’re It!

Once you’ve received all your quotes back, it’s time to compare them. Each should include detailed information such as the description of work to be performed, cost of materials, cost of labor, estimated completion time, warranties on any product and labor and of course the price quote for your project. Although the quote isn’t an actual contract, it should cover most of what you should expect to see in the actual contract.

Remember that although price usually weighs the heaviest when selecting your contractor, remember that cheapest isn’t always better. There are many factors that you should consider before making your selection. Review each one closely.

Done Deal.

It’s finally here! Time to get moving.

Next time you meet with the contractor, you will be required to sign a contract. It is a good idea to have a copy of the original quote document handy. All of the items and any amendments you discussed with the contractor should now be in your contract, along with much more detail. Verbal agreements are not acceptable, so make sure you take the time to review it all and make sure it’s in writing. Consider having an attorney review your contract for large projects prior to signing it.

So there you have it. With a simple combination of gathering, sharing, planning and learning, you can in fact complete a very smooth and successful home improvement project. While minimizing unnecessary stress, maintaining control and that wonderful smile, all the way to the bank.

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